Piano by number for children's piano lessons

 

 

Walden Pond Press publishes the PIANO BY NUMBER series

Let Kids Decide When To Play Piano With Both Hands

 

 

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LET KIDS DECIDE WHEN TO PLAY PIANO WITH BOTH HANDS

The act of using two hands at the piano involves an exquisitely complicated relationship between the two hemispheres of the brain, the left brain controlling the right hand, and the right brain controlling the left.

What many people forget is that children's brains take time to establish that relationship, and any attempts to force such a relationship it will be met with resistance, if not outright discomfort.

You can push gently in the direction of two hands, but most kids, even nine and ten year-olds, are in varying stages of this hemisphere development.

If you insist on it, you may cause the child such discomfort that they will then associate that discomfort with the piano and eventually quit.  Better to wait, let them enjoy what they can do easily, develop the dominant right hand and let nature take its course.

My discovery is that kids who are allowed to choose when to play with both hands all eventually decide to play with both hands, and, when they do, are happy about it and throw themselves into it. Had I insisted on two hands, it would have been a disaster, given the degree of enthusiasm they show when allowed to choose for themselves.

It's important to keep probing, offering two-handed situations, rather than to abandon it completely. Perhaps the child benefits from these "dry runs," as long as they are allowed to choose when to stop the "experiment," and return to more immediately rewarding musical activities.

It's essential to not brand the child a failure during these experiments. If they fail, just move on, and be aware that they are not fully ready. Don't acknowledge any failure, just nod, smile and move on.

I observed that most kids were very happy playing with one hand, while developing various skills like fingering and note reading.  But that happiness vanished when presented with the task of trying both hands. You can see the discomfort on their faces.

For some reason, all kids know when they are ready to try both hands, much like knowing when they want to try diving into the deep end of the pool, or try their bike without training wheels.

I can't see inside their brains, but I can observe their reaction to the demands of bi-hemisphere playing, and any piano teacher who is not a fool can easily tell when to back off.

I number in the hundreds the children I have taught who couldn't get the hang of two hands until they were ready for it.

Be patient enough to allow the child to enjoy the piano in their own way until their brains have developed to the point where they can easily enjoy it "your" way.

You'll be happy you did, if you can wait that long. 

By John Aschenbrenner Copyright 2012 Walden Pond Press All Rights Reserved

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Piano Lessons: A Child's Point of View

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The Complete package includes all six basic Piano By Number Books.

 

THE COMPLETE BOOK PACKAGE: 

1. 107 page illustrated THE CHRISTMAS CAROL KIT Book with 44 songs, Play Along Audio CD, and removable stickers   

2. 120 page illustrated PIANO IS EASY Book with 50 songs, Play Along Audio CD, and removable stickers 

3. 50 page I CAN READ MUSIC Book 

4. 132 page TEACH YOURSELF PIANO STEP BY STEP Book, 56 minute DVD Video and removable stickers 

5. 150 page THE BIG BOOK OF SONGS BY NUMBER Book with 134 songs, and removable stickers 

6. 88 page EASY CLASSICAL PIANO BY NUMBER Book with 10 songs, and removable stickers, and 29 minute Play Along Audio CD 

6 BOOKS, DVD AND 3 PLAY ALONG AUDIO CDS 

Our BOOK PACKAGE price: $89.95Click here to order THE COMPLETE PIANO PACKAGE

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You can also purchase individual books with CD $24.95

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