Piano by number for children's piano lessons

 

 

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How A Child Sees The Piano Keyboard

 

 

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HOW A CHILD SEES THE PIANO KEYBOARD

These observations are largely conjecture, to be sure, but so many years logged watching kids try the piano leads me to the following comments.

Kids don't see the black keys, really. They are a set of controls that aren't obvious to them, since you can do so very much with just the white keys. They don't understand why the black keys are raised above the white keys, or that the black keys are consistently organized in 2's and 3's.

Kids don't realize that the piano's controls are less than a foot wide, repeated seven times over the distance of the keyboard. To them, it's five feet of confusing buttons, no pattern or reason to it.

One hand is enough to consume the average child's brain. Two hands is nuclear physics. One finger is a reasonable controller for them.

Direction and dimension do not exist. It is muddled semantics to them that the piano keyboard turns up and down into "sideways." "Why would you do something that crazy?" they ask themselves.

When an adult plays something complex on the piano, it is magic to a child. There's no other explanation, because clearly humans can't move their fingers that fast, can they?

Kids don't understand the relationship between skill at the piano and practice/deferred gratification. To a child, your skill was acquired instantly, magically, mysteriously. Telling them that if they practice they will acquire your level of skill sounds like a lie and a fairy tale to them. They cannot comprehend time in the sense of developing piano talent and skill.

If you intimidate the child with your demands, the piano is a torture device. If you delight a child with the piano, it is a mutual toy. And if you delight them, eventually you might be able to demand a little and get it.

For a child, it is difficult to summon the simultaneous skills required. Piano requires hundreds of little skills that must be dispatched simultaneously. Few children's brains can segment their concentration, as the piano requires, constantly.

When you ask for too many skills at once, the child becomes overwhelmed and soon discouraged. A better ploy is to build certain skills while ignoring others until later. With some children, this is the only approach possible.

Of all the skills at the piano, rhythm is the hardest for kids. They may be able to dispatch several skills admirably, but if you add the constraint of time, the whole piece may easily fall apart.

That's why I give the widest latitude to rhythm, at first, so that the child is not pestered with a constant stream of corrections, as would be the case if you insisted on rhythmic perfection or anything close to it.

A child sees the piano as an fun opportunity to make music, and if you let them do that, they may learn your more serious version of the piano, too.

By John Aschenbrenner Copyright 2012 Walden Pond Press All Rights Reserved

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Piano Lessons: A Child's Point of View

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THE COMPLETE BOOK PACKAGE: 

1. 107 page illustrated THE CHRISTMAS CAROL KIT Book with 44 songs, Play Along Audio CD, and removable stickers   

2. 120 page illustrated PIANO IS EASY Book with 50 songs, Play Along Audio CD, and removable stickers 

3. 50 page I CAN READ MUSIC Book 

4. 132 page TEACH YOURSELF PIANO STEP BY STEP Book, 56 minute DVD Video and removable stickers 

5. 141 page THE BIG BOOK OF SONGS BY NUMBER Book with 130 songs, and removable stickers 

6. 88 page EASY CLASSICAL PIANO BY NUMBER Book with 10 songs, and removable stickers, and 29 minute Play Along Audio CD 

6 BOOKS, DVD AND 3 PLAY ALONG AUDIO CDS 

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