Piano by number for children's piano lessons

 

 

Walden Pond Press publishes the PIANO BY NUMBER series

What Bores Children In Piano Lessons \

 

 

HOME

PRODUCTS

ALL PRODUCTS

PIANO IS EASY

I CAN READ MUSIC

BIG BOOK OF SONGS

CHRISTMAS CAROLS  

TEACH YOURSELF PIANO

FAVORITE HYMNS

EASY CLASSICAL PIANO

GAMES FOR THE PIANO

CHORD DICTIONARY

 

SAMPLE PAGES

PIANO IS EASY

I CAN READ MUSIC

BIG BOOK OF SONGS

CHRISTMAS CAROLS

FAVORITE HYMNS

EASY CLASSICAL PIANO

CHORD DICTIONARY

 

CONTENT / READING

ARCHIVES / ALL READING

ARTICLES

FREE EBOOK

ADVICE COLUMN

AGE TO START

FINGERING

PRACTICING

CHILD'S POINT OF VIEW

LEARN TO READ MUSIC

 

SONG LISTS 

PIANO IS EASY

BIG BOOK OF SONGS

CHRISTMAS CAROLS

TEACH YOURSELF PIANO

EASY CLASSICAL PIANO

FAVORITE HYMNS

 

FEATURES

SONG LIST

PUBLISHER

AUTHORS

SATISFIED CUSTOMERS  

SPECIAL EDUCATION

HOME SCHOOLING  

 

UTILITIES

PRODUCT DESCRIPTIONS

PRICE LIST

FAQ

ABOUT US

CONTACT

PRESS ROOM

PRIVACY POLICY

RETURN POLICY

EMAIL

SITE MAP

PURCHASE KEYBOARD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is our original site

Please click here to visit our main site

 

Start piano at home with your child

Start with numbers, then read music

Books for Younger Kids      Books for Older Kids      Books for Adults

 

WHAT BORES CHILDREN IN PIANO LESSONS

There are several things that children find annoying and boring in piano lessons. It is not the music itself, but how it is presented.

LENGTHY EXPLANATIONS

Children's verbal skills are not that of an adult. Abstractions mean little to a child. The best method of demonstrating something to a child at the piano is to physically demonstrate it, or move their fingers like a puppet so they feel the muscles from the inside.

I've seen piano teachers drone on and on, delivering a ten-minute monologue on fingering or some arcane subject that would interest only another professor of piano. While the teacher froths on and on, you can see the child's interest slipping away before your eyes, never to return. You'll work twice as hard to get their attention back after such a foolish lecture.

REPETITION WITHOUT GAMING

Ask a child to play something once, and they will comply. Ask them to play it again, they will do so but not really understand why. Ask them to play it a third time and they sigh and comply without gusto. Ask a fourth time, and you're likely to hear them say, "But why? I'm tired of it."

This impatience is human nature. You're not going to change the result unless you find a way to make the repetition interesting.

1. Tell them the notes are a secret code and the earth will explode if they can't get it right. Of course, then they will make a mistake just to hear the world explode, so change the game to, "Play it correctly and the world will explode."  Just stay one step ahead of them. Any piano teacher can get six happy repetitions with this step of the trick.

 2. Tell the child that the notes are a secret message to the spaceship and we need them to transmit it exactly to the mother ship.

3. Pretend you're six years old and need to be stimulated. Use your imagination. After all, that is what the child is doing every single second of their childhood. If you want to get into their brains, you'll have to do likewise.

ANGER, GUILT AND RECRIMINATION

Many teachers employ guilt as a means of getting attention. You will get attention, but it will be the most grudging, reluctant attention you have ever experienced.

Kids are hyper-sensitive to criticism because that is almost all they experience from teachers. All day long, "Do this, do that, you're not good enough."

My approach is the opposite. I want that kid to feel better about themselves in a piano lesson than they feel anywhere on earth. If I make the child feel good about themselves and the piano, they will pour themselves into it, working hard and playing just as hard. I want the child to feel like a fellow scientist in a lab, mutually searching for a solution to a problem. We work together.

As we work, I am constantly making quiet comments, praise, and joking comments about the obvious mistakes. We generally don't stop for mistakes unless they are disastrous, because it is enough to point them out and keep moving. If you are positive and friendly about your observations, they will remember. 

GOING TOO SLOWLY

Yes, you must go slowly, but remember that kid's metabolisms are set at about 2000% of the adult model.

Never forget, KEEP MOVING. As soon as you can hear that clock ticking loudly, boredom has set in. Danger zone. Look at it from the child's view. Like someone keeping a balloon in the air, your job is to keep it interesting by gauging their pace and interest.

You need to keep moving, never belaboring a point. If a point is so important, make a game of coming back to it. Remember the TV detective, COLUMBO? He always seemed to be leaving the interview, only to slyly return for just "one more question," usually the SAME question.

Use the Columbo guise. Keep coming back to the same question later, when the child doesn't feel cornered. Also, keep feeding them the answer if it is slow in coming, so they start to respond correctly. Don't let them fumble. If they fumble, supply the information they are struggling for, again and again without rancor or the slightest hint of impatience. It is a game.

For example, if a child is having trouble finding Middle C, keep finding it yourself in various ways: dive bomb, sudden attack, with a pencil, in any way that captures their attention. The information they need is seeing Middle C played, making a mental movie of it. I play MENTAL MOVIE all the time, where I pretend I have a camera and am filming them for live Australian Television. They love it and try to do well for the camera and their "viewers."

I play this game: MIDDLE C RACE. We both get about 6-8 feet away from the piano, and then I say "Go," and the first one to find Middle C wins. Yes, there will be injuries (just kidding) as the child slides to the piano, dashing to show their knowledge.

The result is a child who knows where Middle C is, the real object in the first place. All we've done is use a childish method to teach a child.

Using childish means is probably the best lesson to learn. Often, it is the secret weapon.

If you really want a child to understand something, put it in terms they can embrace.

Your manner is the lesson. Keep repeating that.

A kind manner will get you ANYTHING.

A gruff manner will get you so little that it is useless.

By John Aschenbrenner Copyright 2008 Walden Pond Press All Rights Reserved

 Click here to return the the main articles page.

 

TOPICS OF INTEREST TO PARENTS:

"What is a good age to start piano lessons?"

"What are the benefits of playing piano for my child?"

"How can I help my child read sheet music at the piano?"

Piano Lessons: A Child's Point of View

Visit the WALDEN POND PRESS ARCHIVES and read articles about children and piano

Click here to read the entire tutorial HOW TO TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ MUSIC

LET US HELP YOU FIND AN INEXPENSIVE ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD TO GET YOUR CHILD STARTED!

 

 

THE COMPLETE BOOK PACKAGE: 

1. 107 page illustrated THE CHRISTMAS CAROL KIT Book with 44 songs, Play Along Audio CD, and removable stickers   

2. 120 page illustrated PIANO IS EASY Book with 50 songs, Play Along Audio CD, and removable stickers 

3. 50 page I CAN READ MUSIC Book 

4. 132 page TEACH YOURSELF PIANO STEP BY STEP Book, 56 minute DVD Video and removable stickers 

5. 141 page THE BIG BOOK OF SONGS BY NUMBER Book with 130 songs, and removable stickers 

6. 88 page EASY CLASSICAL PIANO BY NUMBER Book with 10 songs, and removable stickers, and 29 minute Play Along Audio CD 

6 BOOKS, DVD AND 3 PLAY ALONG AUDIO CDS 

Our BOOK PACKAGE price: $89.95Click here to order THE COMPLETE PIANO PACKAGE

See also ENTIRE LIBRARY PACKAGE

You can also purchase individual books with CD $24.95

PIANO FUNHOUSE: Free Online Piano Games for Kids

Click here to visit the PIANO IS EASY home page!

Order Form | See Our Books | Videos & DVD's | Home | Contact Us | FAQ